Re/code did a series on the LA tech scene. It’s eating me alive that I’m on the east coast right now. FML. 

It’s cool. I went there in December w/ 1 small suitcase and planned on coming back east in the spring, but I feel in love with the city (and got dumped via text message while I was there).

I just need to gather myself and do a proper move in the fall and REALLY move there.

There’s this designer/blogger named Meng To. I found him last year because I was researching Sketch and he was doing these in-depth posts on his workflow, how to switch from Photoshop, etc. He was really the only person blogging about Sketch in a meaningful way and it helped me (and a lot of others) give it a shot.

Anyway, I also got to learn a bit of his personal story through his twitter and blog posts. He was trying to get to San Francisco for a year but had visa issues. He’s there now, but in that year he couldn’t live there, he traveled and worked all over the place, wrote this really comprehensive Sketch/ios design book that you should buy, and connected with thousands of people online.

I’m using Meng To’s plight as inspiration.

I know I have to make the most of my time back here on the (L)East Coast and set things up so I can make the most of my time when I get back to LA. 

elcomfortador:

The man who made this illustration passed away today. Hiro Isono, the man who created promotional illustrations for the Secret of Mana games (including this one and this one), did something that not many artists working for video game companies can do: Rather than just drawing from the game itself, he envisioned the essence of the it, that spirit of adventure and all that, and in doing so he created an entryway into a colorful, new world. It helps that these games had a big impact on me, but I actually think the art stands up on its own. Why else make art than to dream up something up that doesn’t already exist in real life and make the viewer wish so badly that it were real?

elcomfortador:

The man who made this illustration passed away today. Hiro Isono, the man who created promotional illustrations for the Secret of Mana games (including this one and this one), did something that not many artists working for video game companies can do: Rather than just drawing from the game itself, he envisioned the essence of the it, that spirit of adventure and all that, and in doing so he created an entryway into a colorful, new world. It helps that these games had a big impact on me, but I actually think the art stands up on its own. Why else make art than to dream up something up that doesn’t already exist in real life and make the viewer wish so badly that it were real?

One of the reasons reality TV became so dominant was because people looked at time as being the metric. And the reason that reality TV works well for time is that the classic reality TV formula, in the beginning, was the tribal council and somebody getting eliminated. So you could have 50 percent of the show being boring filler and you’re kind of wanting to change the channel but you’re like, “Oh, but I wonder if my favorite person’s going to get eliminated.” So you have to watch to the end to see the elimination. In a way, that was a way of gaming time. You could look at that and say, “Oh, they spent an hour watching this show, including the commercials. That means it must be a really high quality show.” But it also might just mean that they figured out a hook that incentivizes you to watch to the end and then did a lot of mediocre content in the middle.